buy into sth phrasal

verb (T)
1 to buy part of a business or organization, especially because you want to control it: Clegg used the money to buy into a printing business.
2 informal to believe an idea

Longman dictionary of contemporary English. 2004.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • buy into sth — UK US buy into sth Phrasal Verb with buy({{}}/baɪ/ verb (bought, bought) ► FINANCE to buy a part of a business in order to have some control over it: »McDowell was trying to buy into the newspaper business. ► to support or believe in an idea or… …   Financial and business terms

  • ˌbuy ˈinto sth — phrasal verb informal to start to believe something that a lot of other people believe You don t buy into all this nonsense, do you?[/ex] …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • Buy — To purchase an asset; taking a long position. The New York Times Financial Glossary * * * ▪ I. buy buy 1 [baɪ] verb bought PTandPP [bɔt ǁ bɒːt] [transitive] 1 …   Financial and business terms

  • buy — To purchase an asset; taking a long position. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary bid (or buy) An offer to buy a specific quantity of a commodity at a stated price. The price that the market participants are willing to pay. Chicago Mercantile Exchange …   Financial and business terms

  • ˌbuy sth ˈup — phrasal verb to buy large amounts of something or all of it that is available Developers bought up old theatres and converted them into cinemas.[/ex] …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • go — 1 verb past tense went, past participle gone, 3rd person singular present tense goes TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SPEAKER 1 LEAVE SOMEWHERE (I) to leave a place to go somewhere else; depart: I wanted to go, but Anna wanted to stay. | It s late; I must… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • come — 1 /kVm/ verb past tense came past participle come MOVE 1 (I) a word meaning to move towards someone, or to visit or arrive at a place, used when the person speaking or the person listening is in that place: Come a little closer. | Sarah s coming… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • look — 1 /lUk/ verb 1 SEE (I) to turn your eyes towards something, so that you can see it: Sorry, I didn t see I wasn t looking. | If you look carefully you can see that the painting represents a naked man. (+ at): It s time we left, Ian said, looking… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • let — 1 /let/ verb past tense and past participle letpresent participle letting 1 ALLOW (transitive not in passive) a) to allow someone to do something: I wanted to go out but my Dad wouldn t let me. | let sb do sth: She won t let her children play by… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • open — 1 adjective NOT CLOSED 1 DOOR/CONTAINER not closed, so that you can go through, take things out, or put things in: an open window | I guess I did leave the door open. | I can t get this milk open. | wide open (=completely open): The door was wide …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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